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Don't be a victim of the "Curse of Knowledge."

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What is the Curse of Knowledge bias?

Many successful entrepreneurs and executives get their start as experts in their field. For example, tech giants Steve Jobs and Bill Gates were experts. And, what about local business people that you know? Your doctor, beautician, and auto-mechanic all may be experts in their field and may also be the owners of their practice or shop. They are probably very knowledgeable and have much to offer clients and customers.

With so much expertise, what could go wrong?

The aspiring entrepreneur or executive, who is also a subject matter expert in their field, may suffer from what psychologists call “curse of knowledge” bias. So, what does this mean and how does it impact our success?

Successful entrepreneurs and executives need to communicate effectively. Think about it. Business success depends on relationships and relationships depend on clear communication. This is where the “curse of knowledge” bias gets in the way. The expert tends to communicate with others as though they are experts too. They have difficulty breaking down complex concepts that they have long understood and struggle even to find words to use other than the specific jargon of their field.

How does the Curse of Knowledge Bias impact a business?

Let’s look at a few hypothetical examples.

Example 1:

After a successful performing career, professional ballerina Nikita decides to open a dance school. She meets with a website designer. Nikita insists that the website feature the fact that she is trained in the Vaganova method and that all classes begin with a traditional barre and progress to the adagio. The website is built and Nikita loves it! It gets decent traffic, but very few parents actually enroll their children in Nikita’s classes. Why? They have no clue what the Vaganova method is. They just know that their children want to have fun and be princess ballerinas. So, they signed up at the other local studio, the one with the website featuring pictures of smiling children in tutus. Nikita’s website doesn’t really speak to them. Curse of Knowledge bias = Marketing Fail!

Example 2:

Joe went for some medical tests and was more than a little nervous about the results. The doctor ever so patiently explained about selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and neuro-transmitters, but Joe didn’t really understand what those words meant. He ended up feeling more anxious than ever. Confused and upset, he decides to see another doctor. Curse of Knowledge bias = Client Relationship Fail!

Example 3:

Lonnie’s family has been in the nursery and greenhouse business for three generations, supplying plants and trees to landscapers and homeowners. Lonnie grew up in the business and knows everything there is to know about plants. It’s almost fall, and Lonnie is very busy. He hops in his pickup truck and before taking off, asks a couple of students that he recently hired to move all of the deciduous trees to the back of the lot of potted trees for sale. They are left staring at each other, wondering which trees, exactly, they are supposed to move. They find oaks and maples, as well as cedars and pines, but nothing called deciduous. As you may or may not know, Lonnie simply wanted them to move the trees that would soon lose their leaves, but his employees did not understand the instructions. Curse of Knowledge bias = Employee Management Fail!

5 Tips to Overcome the Curse of Knowledge Bias

There is nothing wrong with being an expert. In fact, it is usually a tremendous advantage. If you are an expert though, be wary of the Curse of Knowledge bias. You can use these five tips to overcome it in all your communication:

  1. Know your audience - Like a good speaker or stand-up comic, know your audience. What is their background? Nikita’s potential customers aren’t ballet aficionados, they are suburban moms. The patient, Joe, is an engineer, not a doctor. And the students who work for Lonnie? They are willing to work hard, but one is studying music and the other is learning software development. They are not botanists.

  2. Check your vocabulary - Are you using words that your customers, employees or others may not understand? Joe didn’t get “neurotransmitter.” If the doctor had explained that it is a substance that sends an impulse from one nerve to another, Joe, being a reasonably intelligent person could have understood better.

  3. Know your customers - This is at the heart of effective marketing and customer relationships. Just because you think something is great doesn’t mean that your customers do. In the case of Joe, some reassurance from the doctor that he would feel better soon would have gone a lot further than a science lecture.

  4. Educate your customers, but do it gradually - Start with what they want, then show them how it can be even better. If Nikita had managed to gain those suburban moms and their adorable children as her customers, she could gradually introduce them to the wonders of classical ballet and what it takes to truly become a star.

  5. Consider the “why” - Sometimes that is the most effective way to communicate. All Lonnie needed to tell his employees was, “Move the maples and the oaks to the back. They’ll be losing their leaves soon and we don’t want leaves everywhere.”

Let me know if you have any questions or comments. I always enjoy hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Stewart Swayze 

 

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Be Careful How You Interpret Actions, Events, Text, etc. (Video)

As a leader, be careful how you interpret actions, words, text, etc. Your first interpretation could be wrong.

Here are a few Free Personal and Professional Development Downloads for you to enjoy:

Want to know if you’re satisfied with your career:

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Join my Private Leadership & Career Development Facebook Group:

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Decision Making - 5 Best Practices to Overcome Confirmation Bias

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So, you started your own business. Making that choice indicates that you probably have many great entrepreneurial characteristics. You are confident, smart, willing to work hard, and don’t mind making decisions.

Growing from solo entrepreneur to a successful business owner, you will be faced with more and more decisions: hiring, location, finance, business planning, products to develop, marketing, and more. Even if you wear many hats, good decision making is possibly your most important task. Ultimately, though you may seek advice, it is the one task that you must do yourself.
 
How can you hone this critical entrepreneurial ability?
 
It may come as a surprise, but your confidence, smarts and willingness to work hard can get in the way. Having a sense that you are right about a lot of things can contribute to what psychologists call confirmation bias. Confirmation bias is the tendency to seek or perceive information in a way that reinforces what we already believe, even though we think we are seeking the truth. And, for the aspiring entrepreneur, that terrific willingness to work hard may make it worse, since we believe it is possible to push through problems rather than consider them seriously.
 
How does Confirmation Bias impact our decisions?
 
On a simple level, most of us realize that certain biased hiring practices are wrong and that it is a good idea to bounce ideas off a spouse, partner or trusted friend. But avoiding confirmation bias goes much deeper. It involves developing specific standards for how we seek information, how we interact with others and even how we think. That sounds like a big ask, so first, let’s explore why it is so important.

Hypothetically, Zach thinks he has an excellent idea for a product. All his friends think so too. Zach does a lot of homework. He knows what it will cost to make this product and where he can have it made. Zach knows some people at a great marketing agency, and they even have some preliminary designs. Zach does some random surveys at several local coffee houses that he frequents, asking people if they would buy this product. The results are overwhelmingly enthusiastic. He checked all the boxes and is ready to take out a line of credit on his house.
 
Good for Zach, right? Wait.
 
When was the last time you drank a Crystal Pepsi or checked your Instagram from your HP Touchpad? Not recently, probably never. Both colossal business failures came from companies with much more money and recognition than the average entrepreneur. If they can fail, anyone can. The flaw in our hypothetical friend Zach’s approach, and in the approach of many large businesses, is that merely because it's ours, we think it's an excellent idea. Even under the guise of researching, we are just seeking confirmation. Zach’s research would have served him better if he had also asked what people thought was wrong with the product. And, chances are, people at the places he frequents already think like him. Seems that maybe he wasn’t seeking data, after all, just confirmation.
 
Confirmation bias can, unfortunately, lead to fundamentally flawed decision making.
 
Let’s look at how confirmation bias affects our staffing. Yes, not being swayed by gender, ethnicity or religion is the fair, legal and ethical approach to hiring, but it also can strengthen the business. Hiring only those who are already likely to think like you, coupled with the fact that you are the boss, makes it unlikely that you will benefit from having your ideas questioned. It may be good to have employees who encourage you to put on the brakes when you're heading towards a cliff. Great entrepreneurial leadership isn’t about always being right, but instead, seeking the best answers.
 
How do we recognize confirmation bias?
 
You must recognize that we all have biases. We are wired that way for our protection. On a simple level, our biases mean that we don’t eat things that smell bad, try to shake hands with a bear, or give our credit card numbers to scammers. On a more complex level though, biases prevent us from seeing all nuances of a situation.

Our efficient, basic survival brain seeks confirmation. Our complex, business survival brain needs to develop the entrepreneurial skills to see all angles. The online entrepreneur navigating the global marketplace and the brick-and-mortar venture navigating the neighborhood both have much to consider.
 
How do we overcome confirmation bias?
 
Can we grow past this fundamental, built-in tendency? Here are five practices you can start now to improve yourself and your business.
 
1 – Sleep on It. It may seem strong and smart to shoot from the hip and make an immediate decision. But, it’s almost a sure-fire way to depend mostly on your own biases. The world won’t wait forever, but it usually will wait at least overnight.
 
2 – Play or Find a Devil’s Advocate. Instead of seeking evidence that you are right, look for all the reasons why you may be wrong. Even better, encourage your employees to do this. Find a coach or advisor. Be okay with disagreement and keep the channels of communication open.
 
3 – Use the Rule of Threes. Instead of trying to prove that one idea is great, why not try to find out which is the best of three ideas? Or the best of three perfect candidates, or the best of three ideal locations?
 
4 – Integration of Ideas. Once you listen to opposing ideas, maybe you realize that your first take was wrong. But none of the proposed alternatives seem right either. Sometimes the best solution is an integration of ideas.
 
5 – Realize It Isn’t About You. You want to succeed, don’t you? Love your business more than your ego. Ultimately, whether an idea you have is right or wrong is neither endorsement nor indictment of you as a person. But a successful business is a lasting legacy, a reflection of your leadership and wisdom. 

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

- Stewart 

Are you passionate about your career development?

Do you want to become a better person and leader? I know I do! I’ve recently created a Facebook Group, ShapeShift Lab, dedicated to career and leadership development. Everyone is welcome to join: http://bit.ly/2MtANfq

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How to Make Failure Count

Learning from failure

"The essential part of creativity is not being afraid to fail." ~ Edwin Land


It’s time to get out of your head and start taking action. No matter the size of your action, start moving forward. You cannot succeed or fail until you get that idea out into the world. The truth is, sometimes you’ll be right, and sometimes you’ll be wrong. Either way, you will learn from the journey.
 
Doing something new, challenging the status quo, or testing limiting beliefs can be a scary process. But staying safe by not acting, that gets you nowhere. The key is to track your data. Learn from success and from failure. Know your data like the back of your hand. All data is useful data. Stop guessing what went right or wrong.
 
Learning from failure
 
A while ago, I was about to run my first AdWords campaign. As a Strategy Consultant, I’ve recommended AdWords campaigns on numerous occasions. However, designing and executing an AdWords campaign was something new to me as an Executive & Business Coach. I was nervous as hell. There was a real risk of losing my cold hard cash. Gulp!
 
Guess what?! My first AdWords campaign flopped. Zero Conversions. ZERO! At first, I was disappointed. Some might say I wasted money and should have hired a professional. But, that disappointment quickly changed into positive insights. I had an idea in my head. I took action. I reframed the experience and learned.
 
My Executive & Business Coaching services were new, and I only had few clients. My AdWords campaign was set up to drive traffic to a landing page and convert unique visitors into new clients. Here’s what I learned from that “failed” campaign:

·     Detailed demographical data for my target audience

·     Time of day my audience is surfing the internet

·     Precise locations of my target audience

·     That my landing page needs optimization

·     That my AdWords campaign needs optimization

·     The average Cost Per Click (CPC) for my keywords

·     Exact keywords for future blog posts, copywriting, marketing, ad campaigns, etc.

·     More … more … more

I could go on, but I’m sure you understand the point. You must move forward and take risks. No matter how big or small the action, take that first step. Then, make the next one. As you move forward with each step, inertia takes place. Next thing you know, you’ll be flying down that path towards success.
 
Failure is a course corrector
 
Let’s go back to that AdWords Campaign again. Sure, I lost some money and a few hours of time. That sucks. But, what if I didn’t run that campaign? What if I didn’t learn those lessons and collect all that data? What if I waited until I spent several months putting together a giant online video course (coming soon) and then ran my first AdWords campaign? If that were the case, I wouldn’t know, in detail, all the lessons learned from above. Months of time and money could be lost.
 
Wait, but Stewart, you already knew your target audience and a lot of the other information too. You conducted research and developed Buyer Personas, right? Yes, yes I did. However, my research and Buyer Personas were based off hypotheses, not hard data. Now, I have actual data. Now, I have well-informed Buyer Personas, demographics, and psychographics of target my audience.
 
My “failure” in one campaign has already led to the success of many others. That failed AdWords campaign corrected my course of action for the future.
 
Find a process to track your actions and decisions
 
Always track your actions. The process to track your actions and decisions doesn’t have to be automated or complicated. It can be as simple as a journal. Consider using a cradle to grave analysis. Write your actions and decisions in a journal from the beginning to the end. Once you reach the end, analyze the wing-to-wing process and decisions you made along the way.

What went well? What didn’t go well? What were the strengths? Where are your opportunities for improvement?What were your lessons learned (positive/negative)? How can you apply those lessons learned next time?

 
Preserve and Pivot
 
When something goes well, preserve those findings. Adapt, rinse, and repeat successful actions. If something didn’t go well, take the time to develop a deep understanding of why. What happened that was under your control? What happened that you could have influenced differently? What happened that was entirely out of your control?
 
Start with what you can control. Pivot away from actions if they resulted in negative results. Then, look at what you could have influenced. Determine steps you can take, next time, to positively influence the outcome. For anything outside of your control, relax and smile. Understand sometimes this happens. I’d still analyze what was out of your control. You might find ways to mitigate or reduce your risk moving forward.
 
To wrap it up, take action. Move forward. Learn from each step by developing a process to track your data. Use data to preserve the positive and pivot away from the negative. Have fun and enjoy your journey!

- Stewart 

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Organizational Skills Can Significantly Impact Your Success! (Video)

Learn more: https://www.stewartswayze.com/coaching/

I remember the first year I filed my self-employment taxes. I was sweating, frustrated, and a bit scared. Not because I didn’t know how to file taxes. Not because how much I had to pay. Nope. None of that bothered me.

There was another more significant problem. It was my total lack of organization. I couldn’t find anything. I had receipts in my desk drawers,in my “receipts” case, laptop bag, filing cabinets, and even found a few in my luggage. Yep, buried deep down in my luggage.

Think about it this way, my unorganized mess caused unneeded stress, inefficiency, anxiety, and time. We all know time is money! Lesson learned.

The second time, damn I was organized. I had everything in the correct place. I had bookkeeping and accounting software ... with the click of a button, financial reports printed off in perfect format. Opened up one drawer, receipts in hand. Zip, zoom, bang, and done and off to the accountant.

If you want to be successful you must work on your organizational skills. This type of organization includes offline and online, paperwork in filing cabinets, or cloud-based folders.

Organization increases efficiency. You reduce the time spent on mundane tasks and free up time to work on growing your business.

Thanks for watching and see you next time. As always, if you have any success tips, feel free to connect, comment, and share!

Here are a few Free Personal and Professional Development Downloads for you to enjoy:

Want to know if you’re satisfied with your career:

Want to BECOME THE CAUSE OF YOUR CAREER:

Join my Private Leadership & Career Development Facebook Group:

SAY HELLO ON SOCIAL MEDIA

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How do we create positive energy from feelings? Feelings are not facts. (Video)

Facts vs. Feelings. Thanks to David D. Burns for this one. Negative thoughts are feelings that build into a snowball effect. Every negative thought compounds upon another. But, feelings are not facts. They are emotions. Humans sometimes believe that our emotions are a self-evident truth that your feelings are beyond question. You know the quote, “trust your feelings?”

What happens if the thoughts feeding those feelings are irrational? What if you based your feelings on a misconception or prejudice? Then always trusting your feelings wouldn’t help you in the long run. Always question yourself. Do your feelings or emotions accurately reflect reality?

Emotions are almost the last thing we should trust. Your feelings and emotions are not facts. How we react to feelings and emotions can determine our success. You have a choice to respond positively or negatively.

You have the opportunity to take a mental step back, find the facts, and determine how to react. If you chose to allow negative feelings to overcome your thoughts, you lose. If you reframe, learn, and grow from the source of negativity, you succeed.

Everyone experiences negative feelings and emotions. It’s up to you to use them to create or destroy energy and enthusiasm for what comes next.

Thanks for watching and see you next week. As always, if you have any success tips, feel free to connect, comment, and share!

Here are a few Free Personal and Professional Development Downloads for you to enjoy:

Want to know if you’re satisfied with your career:

Want to BECOME THE CAUSE OF YOUR CAREER:

Join my Private Leadership & Career Development Facebook Group:

SAY HELLO ON SOCIAL MEDIA

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What if I said your "Positive Thinking" strategy was totally wrong? (Video)

We all know positive thinking helps you reach your goals. But, what if I told you that part of this could be wrong?

Let’s take a moment. Close your eyes and think about an obstacle you are trying to overcome. Now, use positive thinking to visualize overcoming that obstacle. Open your eyes and answer this question. Has anything changed? Nope, we just created a “positive fantasy.” That’s the risk. Nothing changed

Too many people use the power of positive thinking, which might be a good start, but the never plan or take action.

Gabriele Oettingen in “Rethinking Positive Thinking” suggests using a method of mental contrasting, the process of associating obstacles with the behaviors needed to overcome them.

So how do we actually do this? Her suggestion is the WOOP method.

  • Wish –Visualize a wish or concern and hold it in place

  • Outcome – Envision the positive result you want to occur

  • Obstacle – Identify any obstacles that could potentially stop you from reaching the outcome

  • Plan – Determine actions you can take if, when, and where those obstacles occur

Last but not least, write your plan down. Translate your positive thinking fantasy into actionable steps.


Overcome Your Fear of Failure

Course: Transform Your Fear of Failure

Create the Energy You Need for Success


Do you suffer from the Fear of Failure? If you’re reading this post, you’re in luck! For a limited time you can take $10 off my course: Transform Your Fear of Failure - Create the Energy You Need for Success. I have no doubt you’ll find great value in this course!

CLICK HERE: TRANSFORM YOUR FEAR OF FAILURE - CREATE THE ENERGY YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS

Coupon Code: FOFBLOG2019

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What Your Boss or HR Won’t Tell You … Moving Up the Corporate Ladder

What Your Boss or HR Won’t Tell You … Moving Up the Corporate Ladder


What your boss or HR won’t tell you … moving up the corporate ladder

Look, by now I’m sure you’ve read a lot about moving up in a company. You’ve heard "Dress for success." You know to be the first in the office and the last to leave. You keep track of your accomplishments and do all the other “no shit” stuff. That is great, do it! I’m going to propose a few twists and other ideas — real world stuff that your boss or HR probably won’t tell you.

Be a team player, but stand out from the crowd

Of course you should be a team player. That’s part of being a good colleague and an excellent leadership quality. But, when you’re in a room full of super successful people so how the hell do you stand out?

Everyone in your company or at the recruiting event wants the same thing. To land that great job. Move up the corporate ladder and move fast!

You need to find a way to stand out from the crowd. When you finally meet the person responsible for giving you a shot, you better stand out! You NEED them to remember YOU — not the other 20 people they just met before your introduction.

When I first started at GE, I put my head down and worked my ass off. I helped my teammates, landed some big deals, and flat out executed. My goal was to stand out with my performance, and I was on my way!

The only problem ... nobody at the top knew who I was. My boss knew and loved my performance. As for our team's leader ... no freaking clue. In fact, during one of my presentations, he asked his right-hand man who I was. I’d been on the team over a year.

Why? How can this happen? I put my head down and executed, but didn't find a way to stand out from the crowd. Just like me, my teammates all performed and were successful.

After reading "Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don't" by Jeffrey Pfeffer I found a way to stand out. I recommend reading this book to anyone entering the corporate world. I'll give you some tips below, but you’ll need your own way to stand out.

Get in shape

I’m sorry. This might piss a few people off, and I agree 100% with those people. For me, it’s all about performance. What you do and how you do it! So it sucks, but there's evidence that getting in shape helps your career. It should have nothing to do with performance or promotions. But, if anyone tells you this isn’t true, they are lying or naïve. People judge. It’s a sad and simple fact. Here's a Business Insider article on the topic, "Attractive People Are Simply More Successful."

As an example Daniel Hamermesh found:

· Attractive people, both men, and women, earn an average of 3% or 4% more than people with below average looks

You can find his book on Amazon, “Beauty Pays: Why Attractive People Are More Successful”

Working out and getting into shape has benefits outside of income

So take the advice to dress for success, but also get into shape. Studies show that as you get into shape, your self-confidence increases. Exercise is also a way to relieve stress, decompress, gather thoughts, etc. These are all facts. Shoot, you can even learn new skills or expand your knowledge while exercising. Find a book on tape or podcast. Learn as you get in shape.

You don’t have to go crazy. Take small steps. Stop drinking sugar filled crap, eat a little healthier / smaller portions, and take daily walks for 30 minutes. It's a journey, not a sprint. Please consult with a physician first though.

Lead teams outside of work

I'm sure you already know this one, but it’s worth a short mention. Leading teams outside of work will help to develop management/leadership skills. Find a local charity, non-profit, or professional organization. Volunteer to lead teams, projects, or be on the board. Discuss what you are learning, where you are failing, and where succeeding with your network. Let everyone know you are taking on extra responsibilities to develop as a leader.

Become an expert at something everyone hates, find a better way to do it, and then teach others

We all have processes, tasks, or other things that suck but have get done. Nobody wants to do it because it’s broken, archaic, or complex. This is your opportunity.

First, become the expert. Learn everything you can about the current process. Then, find a better, faster, or simplified way to do the same process. You become the expert and solution to the problem. Last, teach others to do it.

Network like hell

You’re only as good as your network. As you move up an organization, your network becomes your most important asset. It's the age old saying ... "it's often not what you know but who you know." It's not just someone giving you a chance because they know you.

Did you know that people also get promoted because of the value of their total network? Think about the term "value." Your network has a perceived value to others.

A long time ago I knew someone that wasn't the best executing or planning anything. I’m being nice saying that. Yet, this person moved into a high-level role within a company. If you needed anything and I mean anything, this person could find ten people to get it done. Or, someone that has the information, data, and resources you need. In this case, network value outweighed personal performance. Your goal should be to exceed at both performance and networking.

Understand corporate politics including credits and debits

As much as we hate it, corporate politics is a living and breathing beast. I'm not talking about brown-nosing. You might find it shocking, but there's a form of corporate politics that's a system of credits and debits. These credits and debits are political currency. It’s a simple concept to understand, but executing is a different story. When you go out of your way to do something for someone … you receive a credit. When you need something from that person, it's a debit.

Skilled corporate politicians build a lot of credits from high-level or strategic contacts. The higher up the corporate ladder or, the more strategic a person is … the more value a credit carries. I’ve seen this in action. It's incredible how well it works.

Be cautious though. This type of corporate politics can be dangerous. Execution is key. At first, you have to figure out how to do this without the other person knowing.

Learn to communicate

You’ve heard this one as well. But, I can't emphasize it enough. I’ve worked with 100s of executives and mid-level managers all over the world. All were good are their job. The single skill that separated good from great … communication.

Can they present a clear and concise message? Can they think on their feet? Do they answer the question first, and then provide background? Do they pause and allow for comment versus puking the presentation?

Learn to understand the audience. Provide the information they need, not the information you want them to hear. Communication is an asset and requires an investment of time, money, and/or resources. Practice your communication skills. Work with a colleague or join Toastmasters.

Solve problems and remove roadblocks on your own

So you have a problem, challenge, or roadblock. Don’t go to your boss with every possible reason or excuse why you can’t get something done. Solve it yourself. Learn to diagnose the root cause and attempt to fix it. If you fail the first time, learn, and try an alternative solution.

If for some reason you cannot solve it on your own, then at the least propose several solutions to your boss. Don't worry if the solutions are wrong. Don't bother if he/she doesn’t agree with them. Your boss will appreciate the fact that you proposed solutions and not just excuses.

This scenario would go something like this: Boss, we have a problem. The problem is 1, 2, and 3. I’ve tried X, Y, and Z. All have failed. This is what I’ve learned. My next thought would be to try A, B, or C. What are your thoughts?

I hope this helps. If you’d like to discuss more, feel free to reach out.

Sincerely,

Stewart Swayze

ABOUT STEWART

Hi. I’m Stewart Swayze, I’m a Career Transition and Marketing Coach for Entrepreneurs. I release new videos every week on those topics. If your interested in developing your career or marketing your business, view my YouTube Channel below.

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